Streets, like rivers, must breathe.

Stream formed a pact with Tree. “Wrap me like a bandage at my banks,” said Stream, “and I will provide your wet roots with sustenance.”

And so Tree anchored the banks of Stream, ensuring healthy, shaded waters that were filtered and infused with life-giving oxygen.

The partnership between Stream and Tree is yet another beautiful interplay in nature.

It happens in cities, too, but with Street and Tree.

Tree shades Street and soaks up the angry waters of Storm. Tree makes Street breathe–with color, with healthfulness, with life. Tree buffers the city’s most noxious resident, Car, from sauntering pedestrians.

Don’t believe me? Would you like to walk here, in St. Louis’s leafy and gorgeous Lafayette Square neighborhood?

Revived in the late 1970s, Lafayette Square has been St. Louis's revitalization showpiece for decades. Its lush "Painted Ladies" vie for attention with a vivid tree canopy, shown here and throughout this series in the formative days of early Spring.

Revived in the late 1970s, Lafayette Square has been St. Louis's revitalization showpiece for decades. Its lush "Painted Ladies" vie for attention with a vivid tree canopy, shown here and throughout this series in the formative days of early Spring.

The neighborhood was nearly destroyed in its entirety in 1896 by a huge Cyclone. Luckily, residents restored both the homes and the neighborhood's beautiful greenery and gardens. The centerpiece of the neighborhood, Lafayette Park (not shown here), is the nation's oldest park west of the Mississippi.

The neighborhood was nearly destroyed in its entirety in 1896 by a huge Cyclone. Luckily, residents restored both the homes and the neighborhood's beautiful greenery and gardens. The centerpiece of the neighborhood, Lafayette Park (not shown here), is the nation's oldest park west of the Mississippi.

In this neighborhood, the pedestrian feels an immediate sense of comfort. Instead of looking into a street clogged with traffic, a nice street-tree line frames the vista.

In this neighborhood, the pedestrian feels an immediate sense of comfort. Instead of looking into a street clogged with traffic, a nice street-tree line frames the vista.

For more photographs of this one-of-a-kind neighborhood, click here.

Now, let’s look at a negative example, shall we?

trees, or color. How much more improved would this block be with some foliage? Instead, the red bricks bake in the sun in merciless and humid St. Louis summers. This photographer caught on overcast day.

This is a residential block in the city's Benton Park West neighborhood, a much more working class environment than Lafayette Square. While Benton Park West is an excellent example of the robust red brick beauties that have made St. Louis famous as the "Red Brick City", this block lacks one very noticeable element: trees, or color. How much more improved would this block be with some foliage? Instead, the red bricks bake in the sun in merciless and humid St. Louis summers. This photographer caught on overcast day.

If you’d like to see more of Benton Park West (and its neighbor, Benton Park), please click here.

City streets need trees for oxygenation and cleansing as much as a stream needs them for the same.

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